We celebrated the crucifixion and resurrection at a local Orthodox Christian church in Athens. On Friday they light candles and carry the body of Christ around a block morning his death. The next night at midnight they gather outside the church and light candles with a holy flame that comes from Jerusalem and then hug when midnight comes and light fireworks.

We celebrated the crucifixion and resurrection at a local Orthodox Christian church in Athens. On Friday they light candles and carry the body of Christ around a block morning his death. The next night at midnight they gather outside the church and light candles with a holy flame that comes from Jerusalem and then hug when midnight comes and light fireworks.

Something I noticed gradually while in Athens was a kind of weird nostalgia of American culture.

Bars played older American music, some even as old as Sinatra, and everywhere were little signs of American influence on youth culture.

There’s a really vibrant youth culture in Athens, most obvious by the massive amount of (good) graffiti spread throughout the city, especially on the Athens metro.

There were a few striking instances of graffiti basically on top of existing ancient ruins which was pretty crazy to see (top). There’s just so many old artifacts everywhere that it’s easy to diminish all but the most important.

Signs of economic depression are everywhere in Athens, best represented by whole blocks of luxury buildings stuck in arrested development.

(Top) A sign at the airport greats visitors, boasting an A+ Greek credit rating.

Weirdly everything in Berlin was under construction. Almost everywhere we went there was some massive structure being erected near by, making the most consistently visible landmark of the city a small army of cranes.